Landlord Insurance – Rented Property

If you are a landlord and rent your property then you should consider taking out rented property or Landlord insurance.

What is Landlord Insurance?

This type of policy is different to standard home insurance. It covers landlords for loss of rental income if the property becomes unfit to live in (the amount varies per policy) along with other coverage.

Additional Coverage – Protect Your Investment

The right policy will also cover the landlord if alternative accommodation is required.

Coverage type and the amount covered varies policy to policy. We are happy to help you find the policy that meets your needs.

Multiple Properties – Landlord Insurance

If you have only one property or if you are a landlord who owns multiple properties we can help you save on your landlord insurance. Give us a call on 0818 224433 / 042 9359051

Types of Coverage for Landlord Insurance

Many Landlords opt for buildings only insurance. However, you may want to also include contents insurance if there are substantial furnishings and appliances that you own in the rented property.

Many policies include the following as standard, be sure to read what additional coverage your policy includes:

1. Loss of rent and the cost of alternative accommodation if nobody can life in the home due to damage caused by insured perils such as storm, fire, smoke damage etc.

2. Fire brigade charges up to a specified amount.

3. Replacing locks, including keys, to any outside door of the home if the keys have been stolen.

For landlord insurance with building insurance and optional content insurance, simply fill out our landlord insurance quote form or give us a call on 0818 224433 / 042 9359051

Get a Landlord Insurance Quote Now.

Car Insurance with a Criminal Conviction

What is Convicted Driver Insurance?

Convicted driver insurance is insurance for a driver who has a criminal conviction. The cost of insurance is usually higher when the driver has a previous criminal conviction.

Does a criminal conviction make it harder to get car insurance?

A criminal conviction makes it harder to get car insurance. Surprisingly to many, this does not only include convictions that relate directly to driving. Any conviction may result in certain problems when seeking car insurance.

How to get car insurance when you have a criminal conviction

The first thing you need to do is disclose your conviction to your insurance broker and insurer. Never hide your conviction because it will lead to problems down the line. It may result in your policy being voided.

It is also important to know that any conviction must be disclosed even if the event or the conviction happened after the policy of insurance was taken out.

This is something that can easily be forgotten but is just as important as disclosing the conviction when the policy is taken out. In this circumstance, it is up to the policy holder to make contact with their insurance provider and notify them about the conviction.

There are insurers who specialise in policies for people with convictions. It is possible for a convicted driver to shop around to find the best quote.

Spent Convictions – Car Insurance

What is a “Spent” Conviction?

Some convictions are regarded as “spent” after 7 years. The 7 years is counted from the date of the sentence (conviction).

These are:

  • All convictions in the District Court except for convictions for dangerous driving and a single conviction in either the District our Circuit Court which resulted in a prison term of less than 12 months or a fine
  • Convictions for a sexual offence or an offence tried in the Central Criminal Court must always be disclosed and are never “spent.”

Up until 2016, there was no set time in Ireland whereby there was expungement of adult criminal convictions after a set period.

In terms of insurance, it is really a lifelong punishment since all insurance companies ask, at the time of new business quotation and/or renewal, whether there has ever been any criminal convictions.

The 2016 act states “If you have been convicted of fraud, deceit or dishonesty in respect of a claim under a policy of insurance or a policy of assurance, you have to disclose that conviction on any insurance or assurance proposal or form.”

Failure to disclose such convictions could mean that your policy is invalid and cancelled from inception date – effectively meaning that cover never existed. It will also mean that any claim will not be paid.

It is important to note that these rules apply to all insurance policies, not just car insurance.

Questions Insurance Brokers/Companies will ask a Convicted Driver

At quoteme.ie we ask the following question when we receive an application for car insurance:

“Have you or any driver who may drive your car ever had any convictions for any offence of any nature or any pending prosecutions?”

Convicted Drivers Insurance

In the case where the offence resulting in the conviction was related to driving you will have to disclose details. For example, in the case of seeking car insurance for a person convicted of a drink driving related offence a number of additional details are required.

A number of insurance companies provide quotes to convicted drivers. We get quotes on your behalf from these insurers so you can select the best quote.

Convicted drivers insurance can be significantly higher than a driver without a conviction. That’s a key reason to shop around for your quote. We can help you get cheap convicted drivers insurance. Everyone’s circumstances are different. You may be surprised at how much you can save on your policy.

Convicted Driver Insurance and Drink Driving Insurance

We help drivers with a drink driving related conviction get car insurance. During the application process, we require additional details from the applicant that relate to their conviction.

If you have a drink driving conviction, we have a number of insurers willing to quote for your car insurance.

In order to get an insurance quote for a driver who has a drink driving conviction we require the following details:

The date of the offence and the penalty you received.
Since 2011 your penalty will reflect the offence so we no longer need to know the statistics around your blood/alcohol levels at the time of your offence.

A major factor in determining the cost of your car insurance policy will be around the penalty you received. If you were disqualified from driving for more than 2 years, you will have lost your no claims bonus, with the obvious consequence.

Even if you have a drink driving conviction it is worth shopping around for quotes. Many insurers will give you a quote but in our experience, this can vary according to a number of factors.

We can help you find the lowest price quote from insurers who have policies for drivers with a drink driving conviction.

Our insurance professionals can help people with convictions get the best possible quote for their circumstances. We recommend that you give us a call and we will do our utmost to find the best quote for you.

Insurance for a Driver with a Conviction

For a driver with a conviction, it is more difficult to get car insurance. Quotes are higher for individuals with a conviction than for people without a criminal conviction. However, this increase in cost can be reduced.

Over the years we have seen many convicted drivers make substantial savings on their policy. Even though the quote will be higher if they did not have any convictions, shopping around does pay.

Please call us for a quote. We will compare insurance companies that insure convicted drivers and are happy to walk you through the application process. Our friendly insurance professionals will make it easy for you to provide all the required details.

Call us on 0818 224 433.

Car Insurance Ireland: What You Need

Car Insurance in Ireland has increased substantially over the last number of years. However, this year. we are seeing quotes from many insurance brokers stabilise and in some cases come down. Car insurance Ireland is a topic that is sure to be discussed at length in the mainstream media.

In general, when getting a new policy for your car in Ireland, or when renewing your policy, make sure you shop around for the best price.

Get a Car Insurance Quote

Getting a car insurance quote in Ireland is easy. It should not take more than three minutes.

Here are a few key things you should have at the ready when you are getting a car insurance quote.

What do you need for a Car Insurance Quote in Ireland?

  • Your registration number.
  • The date of birth for all people you intend putting on the policy.
  • The dates they have passed their test
  • The penalty points (if any) on the licences of those who will be on the policy

Please see full checklist below:

Car Insurance Ireland – Checklist

Car Insurance Ireland – Keep your insurer up to date

It is essential that you inform your car insurer of any relevant changes that have occurred since you took out your policy.

You must inform your insurer if you change your car, If you or another named driver pick up any penalty points or convictions, any changes to your occupation. If you change address or any changes to your health.

You also must inform your insurer If you modify or alter your car. This includes adding body parts.

Car Insurance Ireland – Selling Your Car

If you are selling your car in Ireland simply return your insurance disk to your broker. Some insurance companies will refund you for the remaining duration of your policy. Other companies will not give refunds on a cancelled car insurance policy in the first year of insurance. If you are unsure what refunds you can get, contact your broker.

Changing Your Car

You need to make sure that your insurance policy covers your new car. The easiest way to do this is to send your insurance disk back to your broker and advise them on the details of your new car. You also need to inform them when the transfer of cover is due to take place.

Driving in other countries

An Irish car insurance policy covers you for driving in Europe for 31 days.
Moving to a different Car Insurance Policy in Ireland
Car insurance renewal in Ireland is easy. You can easily move to a cheaper policy instead of renewing with your current provider.

At the very least, you should get a quote from a number of insurance providers before renewing. If you are concerned about the hassle of moving policy, you shouldn’t be. Contact an approved insurance broker that is regulated by the central bank of Ireland. They will help you take out a new insurance policy.

Breakdown Assistance

Many policies offer breakdown assistance. It is always a good idea to read the terms and conditions carefully and ask your broker about the details.

Car Insurance Quote

If you are looking for a car insurance quote in Ireland then simply use our car insurance quote engine. You will be able to compare quotes from multiple insurers. You can also just give us a call on 0818 224433 or 042 9359051. We would be delighted to take you through the entire process.

Car Insurance for a Premier League player if they transferred to the League of Ireland

In this crazy football transfer market, what if a Premier League player was signed by a League of Ireland team? This may not be as far-fetched as it originally seems, considering the possibility of Champions League football for the League of Ireland club.

Since Premier League players are known to drive expensive large engined cars, we have taken a look at what a typical Premier League player would pay for car insurance if they transferred to the League of Ireland.

The Range Rover Evoque is the most popular car driven by Premier League players across the water, so we have used this for our analysis.

We picked four areas – North (Donegal), South (Cork), East (Dublin) and West (Sligo) plus the town of the League Champions Dundalk.

Sligo and Cork had the cheapest quote followed by Donegal and Dublin. Dundalk had the most expensive quote by a clear distance.

Quotes are based on a 25 year old male footballer with a five years no claims bonus.

Dublin:
LOI Teams: Shamrock Rovers, Bohemians, St Patricks Athletic
Car Insurance – Range Rover Evoque Dublin: €2,993

Dundalk:
Team: Dundalk FC
Car Insurance Dundalk – Range Rover Evoque: €4,812

Cork:
LOI Teams: Cork City
Car Insurance – Range Rover Evoque Cork: €2,875

Sligo:
LOI Teams: Sligo Rovers
Car Insurance – Range Rover Evoque Sligo: €2,875

Donegal:
LOI Teams: Finn Harps (Ballybofey)
Car Insurance – Range Rover Evoque Donegal: €2964

Conclusion

Based on car insurance quotes from thirteen different car insurers, Cork and Sligo offer the best value for the player. Donegal comes in second with Dublin not too much more expensive. Dundalk has the most expensive policy quote for the car used in this example.

If you would like a car insurance quote and are not a 25 year old footballer with a Range Rover Evoque then use our comparison engine now.

UK view of the insurance implications for Ireland

Shares in London-listed insurance firms continued to tumble as analysts grappled with the damage that Brexit is inflicting on their customer base and investment portfolios. While suffering fewer losses than the British banks, insurance companies are exposed to the global financial markets through their investments and generate sales that are dependent on the broader UK economy.

On the lawyer.ie website, Stephen Netherway, an insurance partner with London law firm CMS, discusses the implications for the Irish insurance sector following the British vote to leave the EU. The vote has left uncertainty about what a Brexit will actually mean, nowhere more so than in the financial services industry, including insurance, where the UK and Irish markets are very closely intertwined.

Netherway says that Ireland can be justifiably proud of its recognised international financial services sector, with many global multi-nationals based in Ireland operating across a whole range of financial sub-sectors. Dublin’s IFSC already plays on its proximity to London but the ability to further assert its position internationally is definitely now a real possibility with Brexit. Specifically in the insurance field, waving goodbye to passporting rights upon a Brexit will hinder UK insurers from selling their services and insurance in Ireland without agreement and local regulatory compliance. The removal of the EU framework will remove the UK insurers’ ability to offer insurance into Ireland without most likely locally authorised branch offices and specific additional capital requirements.

If this way of doing business is frustrated or made considerably more difficult, at least for a period, simple geographical proximity and market interlinking between Dublin and London suggests a possible negative impact.

A new EU base for many UK financial institutions currently located in London or Edinburgh may become a business imperative. As to where, why not Dublin? But with becoming potentially a new base for some many new financial institutions, how does Ireland manage the arguably increased associated risk of becoming the country primarily liable for the bail-out of any who may fail?

The law of unintended consequences means that while Ireland’s insurance industry faces identifiable threats, there may well be as yet unidentifiable beneficial opportunities. The only certainty is that after Brexit, nothing may be ever quite be the same again for Ireland.

Strange decision over discriminatory practices by car insurers

Car insurance for EU license holders in Ireland is an important issue, since most of the 12% of non-Irish citizens in Ireland are from EU countries. In principle, drivers from EU countries should expect to be treated equally when it comes to car insurance. It is true that one of the obstacles to overcome for EU citizens is the differences between Irish licences and non-Irish licences. A major difference between a non-Irish driver’s licence and a license issued by the Irish State is the amount of information available to car insurance companies in Ireland.

However, in a recent case that came before Ireland’s Workplace Relations Commission (WRC), a Polish man who has been living in Ireland for over a decade lost his claim against an Irish insurance company. The man holds a full Polish driving licence, and has a no-claims discount of four years in Ireland. Yet when he tried to get insurance in June, he was quoted €942. If he had had an Irish license, he would only have paid €768, and if he had held a UK license, he would only have been charged €760.

The Polish driver challenged the decision of the Irish car insurance company at the WRC, the independent, statutory body established in 2015 under the Workplace Relations Act 2015. His challenge was based on the provisions of the Equal Status Act, Discrimination and Related Activities, Disposal of Goods and Provision of Services.

For some obscure reason, the Commission found that the insurance company had legitimately discriminated against the Polish driver, who has lived and worked – and paid his insurance – for 11 years in Ireland. According to the WRC, EU citizens with non-Irish driving licences can be charged more for insurance. This does not seem fair.

Insurance Ireland calls for Brexit Stakeholder Consultative Forum on Finance and Insurance

 

Insurance Ireland, the representative body for the Irish Insurance industry, has called for a dedicated Stakeholder Consultative Forum on Finance and Insurance to inform the Government’s approach to Britain’s negotiated exit from the European Union.

Insurance Ireland believed that Irish interests would be best served by Britain remaining in the EU, and in May the Taoiseach highlighted the importance of the insurance sector and Ireland’s trading relationship with the UK.

Insurance Ireland CEO Kevin Thompson stated “The process and outcome of the UK’s negotiated exit from the EU are of great importance to our sector and the 28,000 people employed directly and indirectly in insurance in Ireland. Our members stand ready to constructively assist the formation of a policy approach to the negotiations that ensures our interests are protected and advanced and we call on the Government to convene such a forum.

Ireland has become a major location for international insurance with ten of the top twenty largest insurance companies globally operating in Ireland serving the domestic and international markets. Currently, one in four jobs in finance in Ireland are in insurance, with a footprint right across the country. The Insurance Industry holds €200 billion in assets in Ireland of which €35 billion is invested in Irish infrastructure and government debt, generates €32bn in premium income (domestic and overseas) and employs more than 28,000 people.

Tips to keep your home secure when you’re out

With the weather improving, we’re all far more likely to be leaving the house for the beach or out meeting up with friends and enjoying the sun! The last thing you want to come home to is a burgled house. Implementing some home security measures can not only reduce the risk of burglary while you’re out and about, but can also reduce your home insurance premium. Here are some useful home security tips:

  • Many burglaries happen because of an unlocked door or window, so make sure all are locked before leaving the house. Don’t leave keys in locks
  • Make sure you lock any side gates, the garden shed and the garage. Don’t leave ladders out or anything else that can be used to climb on and over walls/gates, or used as a tool to break into your home
  • Don’t leave a spare key under the mat/flowerpot, this is the first place a thief will look
  • If you don’t have an alarm, consider getting one that’s easily seen outside as this will act as a deterrent
  • Don’t leave any valuables or your car keys visible through a window
  • If you’re going out at night time, leave a light on. Install external motion sensor lighting

Going away on holiday

In addition to the above, here are some other useful tips if you’re going away for any length of time:

  • Ask a neighbour to take any parcel deliveries for you so they aren’t left sitting on the doorstep
  • Get some timer plugs put on lights around the house to come on in the evening
  • Don’t post any holiday-related posts on social media until you’re home, those 500 “friends” on Facebook will know you’re away!

Using drones to combat insurance fraud

Momentum continues to build around the ways drones could change insurance fraud. Drones have been particularly effective in fighting workers compensation and disability fraud. The New York Post reported last year that a private investigator accessed private rural property to capture images of a man suspected of insurance fraud. Though the suspect claimed he was fully disabled, the drone took photos of him allegedly engaged in heavy physical activity.

Drones can help cut losses due to workers compensation fraud by providing quicker, cheaper and safer surveillance and documentation. Drones can also be an efficient tool for collecting a wealth of information about a property. This means insurers can better document the condition of a risk before issuing a policy. Drones provide great views of roofs, siding, windows, gutters and other components with a higher resolution than satellites or manned aircraft.

Drone data captured during or after a fire can be analysed to investigate why a fire spread the way it did. Was it wind and ventilation, was it fuel, or was it a fraudster armed with gasoline?

The biggest challenge to the use of drones in combatting insurance scams is legislation. In many countries, there are restrictions on the circumstances can be deployed.

The dangers of car selfies

The dangers of texting while driving are well established. Texting drivers are 23 times more likely to be in an accident and, at last, the message seems to be getting through that the risks of text-driving are significant and completely unnecessary.

That’s the good news. The bad news is that a relatively new but equally dangerous phenomenon has arrived – taking selfies while driving. Already, more than 1 in 10 drivers admit snapping themselves at the wheel, with the 18-24 age group identified as the worst culprits.

It’s hardly surprising that selfies have become so popular, with celebrities like David Cameron and Barack Obama gleefully doing it. In and of themselves, selfies are harmless. It’s when a fashion develops for taking selfies behind the wheel that the harmless becomes harmful.

Driving selfies are not only extremely dangerous – they are also illegal. In the USA, an NBC investigation has discovered that over three million images had been posted on Instagram under the hashtags #driving; nearly 50,000 with “#drivinghome;” over 9,000 tagged “#drivingtowork;” and more than 3,500 tagged “#drivingselfie.”

In the UK, the Institute of Advanced Motorists surveyed 500 drivers about how they use their smartphones in the car. 9% admitted to taking selfies while driving in the last month, while that figure nearly doubles for drivers under 35 – an average of 17%. The Institute’s Mark Lewis told Sky News: “What will surprise people is the fact that it’s as dangerous as being over the limit for drink or drug driving. It has the same effect on your capability to drive.”

The campaign against car selfies was not helped when UK pop singer and face of the ‘Make Roads Safe’ campaign, Azerbaijan-born Nigar ‘Nikki’ Jamal, featured on Youtube. Jamal and two friends crash their car while singing in a video selfie. Without a seatbelt on, Jamal was in the back seat of the car as she and two friends in the front seats filmed as they bopped their heads to the music while cruising down the road. The music was suddenly drowned out by screams as the driver lost control and dropped the phone from her hand. Loud thumps are heard amid the crushing of glass and steel. Unfortunately, the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development did not dismiss Jamal from her role as a safe roads ambassador.

Research conducted by the Transport Research Laboratory shows that any kind of mental, physical or visual distraction can impair judgement and reaction times while driving. The Laboratory’s Shaun Helman, Head of Transport Psychology, said that because smartphones have not been around very long, taking selfies while driving has not yet become sufficiently socially unacceptable.